Plastic Microbeads in SomeToothpaste

microbeadsYou might be surprised to learn that those tiny flecks in your toothpaste aren’t flavor crystals. They’re actually plastic microbeads, the same polyethylene microbeads that got negative press a few years ago when they started appearing in certain exfoliating face washes.

The microbeads have been causing a stir ever since dental hygienists noticed the tiny blue bits embedded the gums of patients who use Crest toothpaste, including Crest Pro Health and 3D White.

It then was pointed out that many of our existing wastewater treatment facilities are not designed to capture microbeads before they slip into waterways. They are not biodegradable, and they can pick up toxins such as insecticides and industrial chemicals.

Procter & Gamble Co., the maker of Crest brand toothpastes, states that the ingredient, which was included in toothpaste formulas to add color and visual appeal, is completely safe and is FDA-approved. In addition, the American Dental Association states that clinically relevant dental health studies do not indicate that the ADA Seal of Approval should be removed from toothpastes that contain polyethylene microbeads. The ADA will continue to monitor and evaluate new scientific information on this issue as it becomes available.

Procter & Gamble has announced that it will completely remove microbeads from its dental products by March 2016.

If you are looking for a dentist in the Troy and Birmingham area who utilizes the latest dental techniques and technology, be sure to check out Dr. Douglas Angell. Angell’s Dentistry is committed to providing each of our patients with a beautiful, healthy smile and unmatched dental care. Give our office a call at (248) 362-4330 and be sure to visit our website at: www.angellsdentistry.com.

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